In Celebration

Our friends at Soundstreams are kicking of their 30th anniversary season and offering NAN members an exclusive 2 for 1  concert deal!

Come celebrate at Koerner Hall on October 11 at 8:00 pm. This spectacular concert features works by contemporary masters R. Murray Schafer, Steve Reich, and Arvo Pärt, performances by Gryphon Trio, soprano Shannon Mercer, and percussion ensemble NEXUS, and a new interactive electro-acoustic work for you to experience in the lobby.

Call 416-408-0208 and quote the code “SS30” or buy online.

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Be a part of Making Space for Culture!

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City of Toronto Cultural Services launches another round of ward consultations starting October 4 and running throughout the month.  What kind of space does your neighbourhood need to make art, music, dance? To film, play, practice and perform? We’re coming to your neighbourhood to hear your thoughts. We want to know what’s needed, who needs it, and how we might work together to help make space for culture in your community.

More information regarding the consultation schedules can be found here, and the complete schedule is attached.  We encourage you to attend a consultation in your ward, and be sure to pass it through your networks!

Have your voice heard by taking our survey!

Making Space for Culture is a major recommendation of the Creative Capital Gains report, unanimously adopted by Toronto City Council in May 2011. Finding, building, and sustaining cultural space requires partners from all sectors, private, non-profit, and government. In order to make wise, long-term plans, Toronto Cultural Services has embarked on a ward-by-ward consultation and planning process to determine local priorities.

Questions? Contact makingspace@toronto.ca or 416-392-7367

Culture Days Launch 2012

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NAN celebrated with Culture Days 2012!

  • Performances by Regent Park artists including COBA and Juno Award-winning recording artist Sean Jones
  • Jian Ghomeshi  CBC Q, author and emcee
  • Antoni Cimolino – General Director and Artistic Director Designate, Stratford Shakespeare Festival and Chair, Culture Days National Steering Executive Committee
  • Mary De Paoli  Executive Vice-President, Chief Marketing Officer and Public & Corporate Affairs, Sun Life Financial
  • Michael Chan – Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport

 

Countdown to Culture Days: Eagle Thunder

Thunderbird Native Theatre presents Eagle Thunder: Song of Hope on Saturday, September 29, 2012 from 2:00pm – 3:30pm at Kennedy/Eglinton Library

Shannon Thunderbird

Image courtesy of Thunderbird Native Theatre

Thunderbird Native Theatre (TNT) presents a very interactive First Nations experience entitled, Eagle Thunder: Song of Hope that introduces audiences to the life and vibrancy of Native cultures.

Led by well-known Coast Tsimshian First Nations, Artist Educator, Shannon Thunderbird and Artist Musician, Sandy Horne (Band: Spoons), along with TNT drummers Christine Pohlkamp and Kate Dickson, the audience will sing, drum on big drums, enjoy stories and a little improvisational theatre, all designed to immerse participants in the rich world of Aboriginal people. The Artists expect the audience to participate and sing and drum like everyone is listening! CDs of the music are available for sale.

In collaboration with Culture Days and the Neighbourhood Arts Network, Toronto Public Library hosts Toronto-based artists and arts organizations in a celebration of arts and culture at library branches throughout the city of Toronto. Culture Days @ The Library takes place September 28-20, 2012. Check out this year’s lineup and make a personalized schedule at http://culturedays.ca/en/2012-activities

Countdown to Culture Days: Tapestry for Beginners

Check out Tapestry for Beginners at Leaside Public Library on Friday, September 28, 2012 from 2:00 pm – 5:00pm

Image courtesy of Christian Badanjak

Tapestry for Beginners with Juana Sleizer

In this activity, participants will learn the basics of tapestry weaving in a playful environment. Results will be surprising. You will experiment with unusual materials to create colourful textures and shapes while listening to music to help inspiration. Loom and materials will be provided and you will keep the loom for yourself. Program includes:
Getting acquainted with the materials (e.g. yarns, fabrics, etc.); notions of tapestry; looms; warp and weft; a little bit of history; how to begin and how to lock a weaving.

In collaboration with Culture Days and the Neighbourhood Arts Network, Toronto Public Library hosts Toronto-based artists and arts organizations in a celebration of arts and culture at library branches throughout the city of Toronto. Culture Days @ The Library takes place September 28-20, 2012. Check out this year’s lineup and make a personalized schedule at http://culturedays.ca/en/2012-activities

Countdown to Culture Days: Red Slam

Check out Red Slam at the Annette Street Library on September 29, 2012 from 1:00pm-4:30pm

Red Slam

Photo by Christian Badanjak

RED SLAM is a collective of aboriginal artists who express their creativity through contemporary spoken word/music performance, in the spirit of indigenous oral traditions. Their goal is to uplift self, identify and promote unity through spoken lyricism which arranges meaning (SLAM). Get uplifted and let your spirit soar as RED SLAM shows you the indigenous foundations to art in an urban setting. RED SLAM provides urban arts workshops in slam poetry, music, collective rap, dance and more.

In collaboration with Culture Days and the Neighbourhood Arts Network, Toronto Public Library hosts Toronto-based artists and arts organizations in a celebration of arts and culture at library branches throughout the city of Toronto. Culture Days @ The Library takes place September 28-20, 2012. Check out this year’s lineup and make a personalized schedule at http://culturedays.ca/en/2012-activities

DYPP: Take A Sick Day On August 18

Take a Sick Day! is an August 18, 2012 event organized by the Disabled Young People’s Project. Read on to learn more about DYPP’s objectives, motivations and inspirations.

What is DYPP all about?

We’re all about Youth + Art + Community

Take a Sick Day! Video Trailer

Video trailer courtesy of Disabled Young People’s Project; all rights reserved. Click video to watch.

Disabled Young People’s Project centers the experiences of young people of colour with disabilities through arts based initiatives and community events. The objective of DYPP is to connect young people with disabilities. We are a diverse group of racialized people who identity with or find disability concretely relevant to our everyday lives.

It’s hard to say where the project began, it’s as if it’s always been happening but it started out with the recognition that there is an urgent need for a space that addresses the impact of disability, the ways in which it is framed and understood in our society, in our homes and within our communities as well as and the impact that this framing has had on our lives as people concretely affected by disability. DYPP is a part of recognizing that our communities have always been talking about disability but that the way the growing disability discourse as we know it is largely shaped by whiteness and the west, and white supremacy in activist spaces, in academic institutions and in global policy and actions that seek to address and measure “disability” so that it is as if we are “new” to the scene.

The project stems out of an urgent need to address the fact that disability is contested and has always been – historically, within our city limits and transnationally – and that we must began to do something about it. It’s about recognizing the past, the work that has been done by those that have come before us in our communities and moving forward. We recognize that it is an old tool of colonization and domination: divide and conquer to keep our communities as well as communities of resistance siloed and separated from one another. To that end, we seek to take action in anyway we can to end discrimination and oppression against people with disabilities. For us, this project is very much about saying that race is not a separate issue from disability; neither is queerness, neither is gender, neither is labour and work, neither is education and poverty and access to education.

Take a Sick Day! Flyer

One important thing to mention is that we recognize that we are operating in a nonprofit industrial complex within a neoliberal socio-economic system and so we are trying to think of ways to do the work that we recognize ought to be done with the resources that we have available to us. We are a very new project. We do not know how long we will be here for but while we are here we hope to create safer spaces for our communities to gather in dialogue to  and to discuss what it means to be told that we are ill, sick, or unwell and what it means to have different bodies from those around us who have claimed normal for themselves.

One of the things that we feel we can do right now is to create room for nonjudgmental dialogue and learning and education among members of our community. Many of us have faced extreme isolation in our everyday lives as we’ve tried to deal. It has been very painful, it has been very costly. We know that that this is not ok, and so Take a Sick Day! was born.

Why ‘Take a Sick Day’?

The event is called Take a Sick Day! as a way of calling attention to and honoring the ways in which many racialized, poor and working people with disabilities too often are forgotten or erased from conversations about disability, especially in western contexts. We wanted to draw attention to all the ramifications of the associations of health and disability.

We recognize that an insistence on the careful disassociation of disability from health by many disability scholars and activists is actually a very dominant theme in Euro-American white disability scholarship and activism. Overwhelming emphasis is put on separating disability from health and illness – mainly by social model advocates….We think that the initial insistence was due to saving disability from the domination and authority of medical expertise and discourse, but unfortunately it was done at the expense of many disabled people, by erasing/ignoring one of the main reasons of disablement, namely timely access to adequate health care on a global level.

We no longer find this useful and don’t understand the point of separating “health” from disability, in that they function along the same lines to oppress different bodies and impose very costly – to those labeled as such – ramifications, such as institutionalization and criminalization.

The name Take a Sick Day! is also about the false constructions of merit and labour, the idea that sick days are extravagant, a luxury and cost in a society that has a way of devaluing the constructions of the “disabled body”.

Take a Sick Day! is one event, and we recognize that much more is needed. For some of us, this is just the beginning. Some of us are going because we’ve felt removed from the disability community or didn’t feel like we were a part of one. Others, because it would be nice to be around other youth of colour with disabilities, to learn from each other as a refreshing change. There are lots of giveaways, swag bags and art. The food, the TTC Tokens… come because you want to!

What do you hope will grow out of this event?

Community and a space for youth of colour to discuss disability amongst ourselves. We are not sure what that will look like yet.

Who are the local artists who inspire you?

There are many local artists, groups, scholars, writers who have inspired us as a collective. Aside from the inspiration we draw from ourselves we have to shout out some special people to us.

Artreach Toronto for their unrelenting patience and support for this Project, for maintaining accessible and youth friendly funding structure and for cheering us on all the way! Annu Saini at Frequency Feminisms for her extraordinary art and facilitation skills and amazing show at Radio Regent;Esther Ignani and Critical Disability Studies at Ryerson;Rachel Gorman, Assistant Professor at Critical Disability Studies for quietly and confidently believing in DYPP and creating the most accessible classroom ever for many of us; Robertha Timothy for her outstanding scholarly contribution to race and disability studies; Andrew LaRose for his amazing music from his upcoming album ‘Playground’; Leroy Moore and Sins invalid,Pauline Hwang at paulinehwang.ca,Golshan Abdmoulaie, Tess Vo at the reachOUT Program, Griffin Centre,Isabel Mackenzie Lay, Darcel Bullen at METRAC (Metropolitan Action Committee on Violence against Women and Children), Jayson Gallop Photography,Cory Silverberg, Yaya Yao, Bessie Head; all the members of our advisory board and the numerous other folks who have been our friends and allies and made this day happen!

DYPP logo

Check out the Disabled Young People’s Project’s ‘Take a Sick Day’ at the AGO on August 18, 2012.

For more info, please visit http://takesickday.wordpress.com